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April is Oral Cancer Awareness Month

April 8th, 2021

What is oral cancer?

April is Oral Cancer Awareness Month. If you have been putting off a visit to our Statesboro office, now is an excellent time to schedule one. Regular visits to Dr. McGibony and Associates can be the first line of defense against oral cancer, by identifying early warning signs of the disease, or helping you with preventive care tips to lower your chances of developing it.

Oral Cancer Rates in America

Nearly 40,000 people in the U.S. will be diagnosed with oral cancer this year, and more than 8,000 die every year from this disease. It is a devastating illness: most people who are diagnosed with it do not live more than five years beyond their diagnosis. Oral cancer has a higher death rate than many other common cancers, including cervical cancer, testicular cancer, Hodgkin’s lymphoma, and thyroid or skin cancers. The high death rate results from the fact that most oral cancers go undiagnosed until the disease is well advanced and has spread to another part of the body—most often, the lymph nodes in the neck.

What causes oral cancer?

While there is no way to predict exactly which individuals will get oral cancer, there are some potential causes you should know about—because in some cases, you can minimize these risk factors.

  • Age (most patients diagnosed with oral cancer are over the age of 40)
  • Tobacco use, either from cigarettes or smokeless chewing tobacco
  • Excessive alcohol consumption (especially in combination with tobacco use)
  • Persistent viral infections, such as HPV16
  • A diet low in fruits and vegetables

In addition, oral cancer tends to occur at a rate six times greater in men than in women, and more often for African Americans than other ethnic groups. No genetic links have been identified to explain the higher incidence in these populations, so lifestyle choices remain the likeliest cause.

Oral Cancer Treatments

Once a diagnosis has been made, treatment of oral cancer usually involves a multi-disciplinary team that includes surgeons, oncologists, dentists, nutritionists, and rehabilitation and restorative specialists. Our team will decide on the best approach for each patient, depending on the risk factors and how far the cancer has progressed. The strategy will be different in every case. Some of the most common methods include chemotherapy, radiation, and potential surgery.

Finding out you have cancer can be devastating news. If you are concerned that you might be at risk for developing oral cancer, talk to us about screenings and other things you can do to reduce your risk.

The History of Dental Implants

April 1st, 2021

The earliest endeavors for dental implant tooth substitutes on record dates back to the Mayan civilization, to 600 AD. Archeologists recovered primeval skulls in which the teeth had been replaced with materials the ranged from wood, stones, and jewels to small pieces of seashells.

Like most scientific progresses, the finding of what makes todays dental implants so successful was unexpected. In 1952, a Swedish orthopedic surgeon, named Dr. Branemark, placed a very small titanium cylinder into a bone to learn how the bone would heal. What he discovered was that the titanium cylinder had fused (melded to the bone.) Out of this experiment dental implants would be born within two decades.

In 1970s, modern dental implants made their first appearance. Of course, over the past four decades, the original dental implant has undergone several improvements in both structure and design, but has always been based on the original theme.

Dental implants were first made available to individuals who had lost all of their teeth and had difficulty wearing dentures, mainly because they had lost of much of their jawbone were dentures set. Today, most dental implants are used in place of dentures, for multiple teeth that are missing, or to replace a single tooth.

When dental implants were first designed, they were a one size fits all. The original dental implants were all the same circumference, while the length of each tooth varied depending on the type of tooth it was replacing. The dental implants were smoothed out and polished by a machine, but still did not produce the natural looking dental implants we have today.

Now, with the help of state-of-the-art equipment and advanced technology, implants come in a wide variety of sizes and shape to match the teeth that are missing. The surfaces of today’s dental implants give them a more natural look and feel. In addition, the surface of the dental implant also attaches to the bone much easier and for a longer period of time.

Dr. Branemark's discovery has left an impression on dental professionals, all over the world, including Dr. Jason R. McGibony, Dr. Thomas E. Marshall, and Dr. Kathryn W. Mentzer. If you are considering dental implants to improve your smile’s health, beauty, and function, be sure to contact our Statesboro office to schedule an appointment.

Ways to Prevent Oral Cancer

March 25th, 2021

According to the Oral Cancer Foundation, this form of cancer kills roughly one person an hour, every 24 hours. This means that nearly 10,000 people will die this year from this type of cancer.

Often, the cancer is discovered late, which is the main reason the death rate is unfortunately so high. Dr. Jason R. McGibony, Dr. Thomas E. Marshall, and Dr. Kathryn W. Mentzer and our team want you to know the precautionary steps you can take to avoid oral cancer.

Here are some of the most effective methods:

  • Good oral hygiene is the first step in oral cancer prevention.
  • Visit our Statesboro office every six months for a dental exam.
  • Quit smoking or using chewing tobacco, if you do.
  • Limit alcohol consumption.
  • Maintain a healthy, well-balanced diet.
  • Consume cancer-fighting foods such as vegetables, berries, garlic, green tea, etc.
  • Change how you prepare foods; baked, boiled, or steamed foods are healthier than grilled or fried.
  • Exercise regularly to maintain a healthy immune system.
  • Limit the amount of time you spend in the sun, and be sure to use sunscreen.
  • Conduct an oral self-exam each week.

We know the thought of oral cancer can be frightening, so we hope the above advice can help patients catch it early or prevent it from ever happening. If you notice a negative change in your oral health, contact our Statesboro location right away and schedule an appointment with Dr. Jason R. McGibony, Dr. Thomas E. Marshall, and Dr. Kathryn W. Mentzer.

If you’re ever concerned or have questions about this common form of cancer, don’t hesitate to ask a member of our team.  

 

How can Botox® help my smile?

March 18th, 2021

We all want to have a smile that makes us feel happy. We want to look in the mirror and feel good about ourselves. Botox has been used for several years to help reduce the appearance of lines, wrinkles, and folds caused by repetitive muscle contractions and old age. While Botox is commonly used to reduce crow’s feet (smile lines), frown lines, and wrinkles on the upper portion of the face, more people are using Botox to improve their smiles. If you’re looking to have a smile makeover, here are three ways Botox at our Statesboro office can help.

Improving a Gummy Smile without Surgery

For years, dentists corrected a gummy smile with two surgical procedures: crown lengthening or gingivectomies. While both dental surgeries are relatively painless, they are intrusive; a dental laser removes excess gum and then sculpts and reshapes the gums into an even shape. Healing can take several weeks. However, you can also improve a gummy with Botox. How does it work? We inject Botox into the muscles that control and elevate the upper lip; this relaxes the muscles and allows them to hide more of the gums. There is no downtime to heal with this procedure, and you'll see results in 24 to 36 hours. In addition, a Botox treatment lasts six months, which means you won’t be coming back to see Dr. Jason R. McGibony, Dr. Thomas E. Marshall, and Dr. Kathryn W. Mentzer for further restorations.

Fixing Upper and Lower Lip Lines

Upper and lower lips lines are sometimes called “smoker’s lines,” but age, genetics, excessive sun exposure, and a host of other things can also cause these lines to form. Botox injections between the lip and the skin will cause the orbicularis muscle to relax, which softens lip lines and greatly improves a person’s smile. Furthermore, Botox doesn’t just get rid of lip lines, but it also creates fuller and more youthful lips.

Changing a Down-turned Smile

Do you always look like you’re sad or frowning? Does your droopy smile make you self-conscious? An overactive depressor angulu oris, which is a muscle in the lower part of the face, can make it look like you have a down-turned smile. Botox can be injected to weaken the muscles that pull down the corners of the mouth, which in turn allows the corners of the lips to rise.

While Botox can give you a fuller and happier smile, be sure to consult with Dr. Jason R. McGibony, Dr. Thomas E. Marshall, and Dr. Kathryn W. Mentzer about the best course of action.

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